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amount of foam on pint in your area you will except

General Beer Discussion by BRADPEAR

On the West Coast, and I am sure the rest of the nation, pints are Generally 16 ounces, with the notable exceptions of English style pubs, and continental style pubs. Except for (get this) a Louie the Lizard Buttwiper glass that was a US pint, BUT had a mark for the liguid above which there was room for a "proper" head all the pint glasses i see on the left coast are 16 ounce to the top of the glass. what is wrong with this picture? First off micro brews are not cheap, unless it is happy hour in Chico California where they are $1.00 a pint. At $1.00 a pint, I will gladly put up with say two or three fingers of head, but at full price? No way! This attitude leads to some interesting encounters let me assure you. I have been told sorry, this is the way we do it at the Tied Houses in San Jose, almost punched out the bar creep at Great Basin Breweing in Reno, Nevada, and given dirty looks in most places on the east coast wehn I asked for a full pint. Of course there are many, many more folks who say yes sir, let me fix that for you then the former. I fully understand that some biers are "supossed" to have a head, and on stouts, as long as I am not being porked too bad, (and all nitro is a porking if you ask me), I am good with it. One day i called the Sacremento Office of Weights and Measures and asked for the official state policies on amount of bier in a glass, and was very surprised by the answer. I was passed on to the head of the Department who told me "the amount of bier in a pint glass is a topic very dear to my heart"! The answer is as a consumer we are entitled to 16 full ounces, the head be damned! I was also informed WAM-(weights and measures) busted up a 15 ounce pint racket in SF in the 90s, (thick bottoms), several other micro screwerey hussles like the three finger head on ales and souts, and get this "we are on call to come in and have a few, and check out the screw you are getting. You got a problem with pours, we fix em. I personally drink bier, and enjoy great biers, you have friends in Sacremento". The conversation concluded with a statement at some point standards such as a honest pour line has to be put on pints in ths country, untill then WAM is the recourse for consumers in California. Let me conclude by saying I have much time in not so legal intoxication industries to want to call the heat on someone, and have not used the resouce at any consumers diposal, yet! Bars are not pot dealers, and are a legal business bound by state regulation. The individuals running bars and brew pubs, will not go to prison but only pay a fine, and are required to fix the problem in question ; cheating the public. So, the question is how much foam on a pint of bier will you tolerate, and why? Please give me your views on this topic, Brad


18 years ago
# 1
# 1

VAC
30061

VAC
30061

In Reply To #1 To be honest with ya, I generally don't give a shit, but usually 3/4 of an inch to an inch of head is what I'm looking for.

18 years ago
# 2
# 2

PKSMITH
7945

I say a pint is 16 oz., so 16 oz. is an acceptable amount of beer. The head doesn't really matter. Of course, I don't mind a little less accounting for the head, but 12 oz. advertised as a pint is just plain wrong.

18 years ago
# 3
# 3

COTTRELL
19268

In Reply To #1 The head is important to the full beer experience. Not only does it improve the presentation, but it releases aromas which will go hand in hand with the taste. I like to see 1-2 fingers of foam on my beer, any more is a little too excessive.

18 years ago
# 4
# 4

PKSMITH
7945

Reply to #4: Well, that's what I said exactly, just not as eloquently. Gimme head for the enjoyment of the brew (aroma, color etc.) but just don't cheat me. My point was....don't pour a can of beer in a glass and call it a pint.

18 years ago
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